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Are Easter Gnomes an Actual Thing? An Investigation

Will our kids be left out if they don’t get an Easter Gnome?

MagicSewingStore/Etsy

All of us want our kids to have happy memories of their childhood and holidays are the perfect time to build up those moments. Having an annual reminder of events that are designed for kids in mind is ideal, and Easter is a great holiday for that. We’ve got egg hunts and Easter baskets, the bunny, and now, apparently Easter Gnomes? If you’ve not heard of this trend, you’re not alone… but are these an actual thing? Will our kids be left out if we don’t get them a gnome? Let’s investigate.

Better Homes & Garden did the research, and we confirmed it: Easter Gnomes are really a thing. According to Google Trends, the search for “Easter Gnomes” has increased 92% over the past four years, and we predict that it will go up even more next year.

Doing a quick online search for Easter Gnomes and the search results also point to this being a real thing. There are DIY tutorials on YouTube, Etsy is filled with all the gnomes to choose from, and Amazon has decorate-your-own versions of Easter Gnomes—and Pinterest is infiltrated with them, too.

So, what do you do with an Easter Gnome, or really, what’s the point of these?

Gnomes, or pixies, originated from Scandinavian folklore and is known as a nisse in Norway. In this folklore, the gnomes are bearded, small nature spirits charged with caring for farmers and their families.

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In European folklore, gnomes are guardians of “precious treasures hidden in the earth,” which is likely why we see them in gardens in American homes. Both are connected more to the Christmas holiday as a symbol of good luck and prosperity.

Also, they’re charming. Decorated as the Easter bunny or in pastel clothes makes these even cuter, and that’s likely why they’re now becoming a trend. But, do you need to get one for your kid? Not necessarily – it’s not as big of a trend as giving chocolate during Easter, and your child likely won’t be the only one not to have a gnome dressed for the occasion.

But it is cute and harmless. If you’re looking to up your Easter memories with your kids, one of these Gnomes could be a fun thing. Let’s not turn it into another Elf-on-the-Shelf situation, though, OK?