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This Dam-Submerged Ghost Town is A Modern Day Atlantis

Extreme droughts have caused a town that flooded 64 years ago to suddenly reappear. And the photos are super rad.

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We all know the legend of the Lost City of Atlantis but recently Utah rediscovered its own little town that was lost underwater when the town of Rockport became visible for the first time in 64 years.

Rockport had been sitting forgotten at the bottom of the Rockport Reserve. After the federal government announced plans to build the Wanship Dam in 1957, the small town was abandoned. Nearly 200 people resided there at the time of Rockport’s demise, which was mostly composed of about 27 families.

Drone test pilot Devon Dewey was the one who captured photos of the ghost town and lucky for all of us, he shared them on Twitter.

You can check them out here and see what appears to be the remnants of roads and old buildings, though obviously being submerged for 64 years made them in less than ideal condition. The photos are totally awesome, as it feels like you are getting to hop in a haunted time machine to get a cool glimpse at the past.

“It was really interesting to be standing at an overlook for the reservoir and to see faint traces of foundations of old homes and a road all below where the water would normally be,” Dewey said to Business Insider.

While an abandoned town suddenly reappearing is unquestionably rad as hell, the reason why it was unearthed is decidedly less so. Extreme drought conditions have caused water to recede by 29 percent, which is why the town of Rockport was suddenly visible for the first time in over 60 years. This is a statewide issue, as Utah has reported that approximately 88.1 percent of the state is currently experiencing intense droughts.

“It’s kind of sad, because of the drought conditions, but it’s a cool little glimmer to look back and see what was there,” Utah Division of State Parks spokesman Devan Chavez said to Insider. “It’s helping us remember a little bit of our history.”