The Fatherly Guide to Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity is the view that brain differences are normal. People with autism, and learning disorders such as ADHD, dyslexia, and dyspraxia don’t have deficits; they have a normal variation of the human brain. And no one type of brain is better than another.

The term, which was coined in the late 1990s by Judy Singer, an autistic sociologist, frames brain differences as unique strengths that society — including schools and workplaces — should appreciate. Rather than searching for cures, neurodiveristy suggests that society should change to better accommodate people across the range of brain differences and allow them to play to their strengths.

Neurodiversity is meant to make people with atypical ways of perceiving and interacting with the world feel accepted and normal, and not wrong or lesser than. And when parents understand their neurodivergent children in a context of acceptance and normalcy, kids have a better chance to grow and thrive.

Neurodiversity

When Should You Tell Your Kid About Their Autism? As Soon As Possible.

ByRachel Crowell

The earlier a child finds out about their autism, the better their quality of life.

Neurodiversity

Vitamins Could Actually Help Children With ADHD, Study Says

ByRachel Crowell

56% of kids who took micronutrients had less severe ADHD symptoms.

Neurodiversity

An Autism Meltdown Is Nothing Like a Temper Tantrum — Here’s Why

BySuzie Glassman

You definitely shouldn't react to them the same way.

Autism

3 Big Mistakes Parents Of Autistic Kids Make — And How To Avoid Them

ByRachel Crowell

Hint: Don't try and make them "less autistic."

Parenting

5 Ableist Words a Parent Should Never, Ever Say in Front of Their Kid

ByJulia Métraux

These phrases hurt the disability community.

Parenting

How to Spot Autism Masking in Kids — And What to Do About It

ByRachel Crowell

When autistic kids feel like they have to act differently to fit in, their mental health suffers.

Health

ADHD and Autism Aren’t the Same, But They Are Closely Related

ByRachel Crowell

What to know — and do — if you think your child may be showing signs of one or both conditions.

Health

“Special Needs” Is a Euphemism That Hurts Disabled Kids

ByRachel Crowell

Disabled people have called for the end of the term. Research shows the harm it causes.

Parenting

Neurodiversity Helps Parents Understand the Atypical Ways Kids Think

ByFatherly

Children who have conditions such ADHD and autism have different types of brains, so they think in atypical ways. That's not a bad thing.

Parenting

Understanding Your Autistic Child's Way of Communicating - Fatherly

ByTyler Santora

Understanding your autistic child's means of communication can help parents see their kid for the individual they truly are.

Parenting

Stop Being So Protective of Your Autistic Child, Temple Grandin Says

ByFatherly

Parents often want to protect their autistic children, but they need to gently push their kids to develop new skills.

Parenting

This Is How ADHD Can Be a Superpower for Kids

ByFatherly

Two ADHD experts discuss parenting tips for kids with ADHD, and how to play to the strengths ADHD gives your child.

Parenting

Autism and Its Definitions: From Echolalia to Hope

ByJeremy Wilson

Doctors taught us many terms, but our son taught us the important ones.

Parenting

Twice-Exceptional Kids: Who They Are and How to Help Them Thrive

ByChristian Dashiell

Twice-exceptional children need extra support for their giftedness and their disability.

Health
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New Research Finds Autism More Prevalent Than Expected

ByLauren Vinopal

"Autism now is not something rare."

Parenting

How to Recognize the Difference Between Signs of Autism and Developmental Delays

ByPatrick A. Coleman

Before parents leap to the conclusion that their child is on the spectrum, it is important to look into these diagnostic mimics.