cost of living
Where To Stack Your Cash

Here’s The Salary You Need To Live In The Top 50 U.S. Cities

For someone who doesn’t understand the money enough to not throw it in the toilet, your youngster still costs a whole lot. Keeping your family free of financial hardship is one of your most important jobs as a dad and doing it well all comes down to location, location, location. That’s why GoBankingRates calculated just how much it costs to live comfortably in the 50 most popular cities in the U.S. using 50-30-20 budgeting guidelines (aka the gold rule).

Surveying living expenses like rent, groceries, utilities, transportation, and healthcare the financial advice website calculated how much it costs to live “comfortably,” which is subjective and could technically mean living living like the grandparents in “Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory,” so take it with a grain of salt. They also compared the total amount of income needed to the median household income in each city to see if the cost of living matched up with the average income. For the most expensive city, San Francisco, you’re going to have to make somewhere around $119,570 a year to live comfortably, while the median household income is only around $78,378. That means for the average person in San Francisco, they’re dealing with about a $41,192 discomfort deficit, and they’re not going to be able to create anymore good apps with that attitude.

GoBankingRates

But it’s not all bad, some cities like Bakersfield, California are operating with a surplus, where it costs only $43,425 to live there comfortably, leaving most residents, who bring home about $56,842, a whole lot of extra change to play with (which their children will happily take). Whether you’re looking for a place to move, or simply looking for another reason to loathe or love your city, the numbers are something to consider. But if money isn’t an issue for you, hopefully you’re enjoying this article from a golden toilet.

[H/T] Two Cents

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