parenting books
Reading Rainbow

8 Kids’ Books About LGBT Families That Everyone Can Be Proud To Read

Between the marriage equality act and Modern Family, gay parenting in America has seen more mainstream acceptance in the past few years than ever before. But there are still plenty of adults who think that kids with 2 moms or 2 dads don’t constitute a “normal” family. If you hope your kid doesn’t grow up to be one of them, here are some books about pride, tolerance, and diversity, which will help them understand that even though families can look different, they all have one thing in common: Kids who won’t let their parents sleep past 6:30 AM under any circumstances.


This Day In JuneThis Day In June by Gayle E. Pitman and Kristyna Litten

Kids love a parade, but instead of one that features old-timey fire engines or people in shamrock glasses throwing up on each other, this one is all about embracing the LGBT community. This Day In June shows kids, in a non-stereotypical way, how a Gay Pride parade is more than just fierceness or fabulousness. It’s about being proud of who you are and accepting the difference in others. And rainbows. Lots of rainbows.
Ages: 4 – 8
This Day In June by Gayle E. Pitman and Kristyna Litten ($15)

Red: A Crayon’s StoryRed: A Crayon's Story by Michael Hall

Red has a problem: He’s really blue. You may have never considered a crayon with an identity crisis, but it’s a good way of letting little kids know that just like people, whoever they feel they are is who they are. Because no amount of pushing, prodding, or parental suggestion can turn one color into another. Crayola don’t make mistakes.
Ages: 4 – 8
Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall ($18)

Zak’s SafariZak's Safari by Christy Tyner and Ciaee

Tinkerbots and Lego Boost
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Zak skips the part about lions and gazelles, and instead focuses on giving his stuffed animals (and your kid) a tour about how he was donor-conceived. There are some medically accurate words little ones may not know yet, but at the book’s core is a sweet story about 2 moms who wanted nothing more than to have a baby. Also, the science is 100-percent more accurate than Twins.
Ages: 3 – 7
Zak’s Safari: A Story about Donor-Conceived Kids of Two-Mom Families by Christy Tyner and Ciaee ($15)

Donovan’s Big DayDonovan's Big Day by Leslea Newman and Mike Dutton

Being a ring bearer is a pretty big deal. Not as important as the catering. Or the DJ. Or an open bar. Or the officiant. Ok, so being a ring bearer is a pretty honorary wedding role, but Donovan still feels special at his 2 moms’ wedding. This book serves to show how gay marriage is just marriage — and the only thing that’s controversial are parents busting out the “robot” on the dancefloor.
Ages: 3 – 7
Donovan’s Big Day by Leslea Newman and Mike Dutton ($16)

And Tango Makes ThreeAnd Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell and Henry Cole

This is the true story about 2 male penguins in the Central Park Zoo, Silo and Roy, who wanted to be parents so badly they tried hatching a rock. Yes, even New York’s penguins are out and proud. Unfortunately, the rock did nothing. However, one compassionate zookeeper gave them their baby chick to hatch, and out popped Tango. Admit it. You cried at March of the Penguins, too.
Ages: 4 – 8
And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell and Henry Cole ($18)

Stella Brings The FamilyStella Brings The Family by Miriam B. Schiffer and Holly Clifton-Brown

You’d think that if you have 2 dads, there’s no need to worry about Mother’s Day, but when Stella has a school party for the moms, she starts to worry. Solution: Bring everyone in her life that helps out. Great story about inclusion, but will there be enough Capri Sun and Teddy Grahams for all the extra people? Probably not. Way to ruin everything Stella.
Stella Brings The Family by Miriam B. Schiffer and Holly Clifton-Brown ($17)

One FamilyOne Family by George Shannon and Bianca Gomez

George Shannon’s counting book shows just how many configurations a family can take. Teach your kid to recognize the parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, the guy you call your uncle, cousins you call your aunts, and everyone else that makes up a single family unit.
Ages: 4 – 8
One Family by George Shannon and Blanca Gomez ($18)

ABC: A Family Alphabet BookABC: A Family Alphabet Book by Bobbie Combs, Desiree and Brian Rappa

Get your kid to learn their letters using family situations (like A is for “Awake” — as in, your kid is always up) as a reference point. The big difference between this and your average Chicka Chicka ABC, is that in this one the illustrations are all about inclusion. LGBT families of all kinds are represented in this book with no commentary, which is a refreshing change from real life.
Ages: All Ages
ABC: A Family Alphabet Book by Bobbie Combs, Desiree and Brian Rappa ($13)