Trampoline Park Injuries Flickr / Clintus
A Jumping Off Point

The Downside To All Those Cool Trampoline Parks Popping Up Everywhere

Ever since trampolining became an Olympic event in 2000, you’ve had some hope that Junior is one Sky Zone birthday party away from a gold medal. Sadly, the results of a recent study published in the journal Pediatrics might make you want to consider a comparably hilarious Olympic sport like race walking. Using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, researchers found that an increase in trampoline parks nationwide has resulted in a spike of trampoline-related injuries.

Although more injuries still occur on home trampolines (which the AAP strongly advises parents to get rid of), 9 percent of injuries in trampoline parks required hospital admission, versus to 5.2 percent at home. Between 2010 and 2014, the number of ER visits from recreational parks rose from 600 to 6,932 — a whopping increase of over 1,000 percent in just 4 years.

The International Association Of Trampoline Parks — a real group representing the tramp industry — blames the spike mostly on booming business. The same time period that saw the injury spike also saw a spike in recreational parks, from 25 in 2010 to 350 in 2014. And people must be taking the AAP’s advice … and just going to these park instead, because there were approximately 50 million visits to one in the past year alone.

Kathryn Kasmire, the author of the study, isn’t nearly as un-fun as she might sound, though. She recommends simply taking greater safety precautions such as going when it’s less crowded and making sure there’s only one kid per trampoline. “But there is no activity in which a kid is getting exercise that is risk-free,” she said. Given that 19 percent of the injuries reported were to adults, you might want to take it down a notch too.

[H/T] NPR

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