Santa’s Little Hackers Is The Toy Drive Adapting Gifts For Kids With Disabilities

Santa's Little Hackers
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Raising a kid with a disability isn’t just common, the CDC estimates that one in 6 children (about 15 percent) age 3 through 17 have one or more developmental disabilities. But that doesn’t mean that Christmas is canceled. It means that parents have to get creative, like Deana and Steve Watson. When their now 13-year-old son Max was diagnosed with a rare medical condition that made him unable to speak, they learned to adapt to a lot of things, and toys were no exception.

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While the date to request toys has passed (stay tuned for the sign-up period next year from November 1-15), the date to donate is alive and well. So if you’re looking for a good cause to unleash your giving spirit on, other than your own kid, of course, you can donate to Santa’s Little Hackers by purchasing a toy from their wish list, or donating money directly.

Steve Watson pointed out on their website back in 2014, that these are not merely toys. His son’s modified talking giraffe is what lead to their speech therapist to recommend Assistive and Augmentative Communication, or AAC — technology that would eventually help him to speak through a computer. So they’re not just toys. They’re an important gift that keeps on giving.

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