Give us a little more information and we'll give you a lot more relevant content
Your child's birthday or due date
Girl Boy Other Not Sure
Add A Child
Remove A Child
I don't have kids
Thanks For Subscribing!
Oops! Something went wrong. Please contact support@fatherly.com.

SNL Celebrates Hot Dads With Hilarious ‘Westminster Daddy Show’

Like a dog show, but for dads.

Saturday Night Live/YouTube

On this weekend’s episode of Saturday Night Live, the cast searches for the best daddy in the 85th Annual Westminster Daddy Show. The sketch features host Matt Damon along with Kate McKinnon as co-anchors in a competition for fathers that parodies dog shows.

“Anyone can be a father,” the announcers explain. “But it takes a hot, middle-aged guy with a big job to be a daddy.” McKinnon goes on to clarify that daddies are “men over the age of 46, with a little salt and pepper around the temples, a little play money to throw around, and a smug, knowing smile that says ‘I do sex good.'”

And the competition includes categories for all different types of men, from the West Palm Golf Daddy to the Berkeley Tweedy Daddy to the Wall Street Business Daddy. Each dad is paraded by a trainer in front of snobby judge Georgina Mont-Blanc (played by Aidy Bryant), while the announcers describe the “breed.”

For instance, Berkeley Tweedy Daddy, who ends up being disqualified for refusing to step onto the display platform, is described as being an “obstructionist asshole” and “rude to waiters. West Palm Golf Daddy, on the other hand, is often found on the golf course and recently went through a bitter divorce. And in a shocking turn of events, host Damon even enters the competition as Broadcast Daddy.

Fatherly IQ
  1. What do you want the president to prioritize in the next four years?
    Coronavirus
    Paid leave and child care
    Healthcare
    Climate change and the environment
    Jobs and the economy
Thanks for the feedback!
Oops! Something went wrong. Please contact support@fatherly.com.

The hilarious skit is a welcome change from some of SNL‘s dad-shaming sketches of late. It’s funny without being offensive—which is exactly the comic relief that fans are looking for from the show and its cast.