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Dad Creates App That Forces Kids to Reply to Texts

ReplyASAP was built to make sure kids have no choice but to text back.

If there’s one thing kids love more than texting, it’s ignoring texts from their parents. That can be frustrating for parents, who, you know, might want to know that their kids are safe and sound thankyouverymuch. One dad, miffed by his son’s lack of communication, took matters into his own hands and developed ReplyASAP, an app that makes damn sure a kid never forgets to reply to dear old mom and dad.

How exactly does ReplyASAP guarantee a text back from your kid? Every time a kid gets a text from their parent, the app will “seize” the phone’s screen and set an alarm. The only way to get this to stop is by replying to the text from their parent, which will then allow them to resume normal phone usage. ReplyASAP also notifies parents when their kid has read their text. It’s the smartphone version of parental nagging.

We’re all for the idea. But it must be said that this isn’t the first app developed with the idea of helping parents take control of their kids texting. There have even been apps with concepts similar to ReplyASAP. In 2014, mother Sharon Standifird developed Ignore No More, which was also based around getting kids to text parents back. Except, Ignore No More gave parents the ability to lock kids out of their phone unless they called them back. Of course, similar to ReplyASAP, the concern would be locking kids out of their phones at a time when they really need them, like when they are driving and using maps on their phone.

For now, ReplyASAP is only available for Android devices, but Nick says he is currently working on developing the app for Apple devices as well. Could this be the next great invention in modern parenting? Or is it doomed to be a forgotten failure of overbearing parenting? Only time will tell.