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Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan Markle Gave Archie a Ball Pit for His First Christmas

We only hope there's an official royal ballwasher.

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Archie Mountbatten-Windsor isn’t going to live a normal life. He’s seventh in line for the British throne, after all, and he’s a globally known figure just eight months into his life. Of course, he doesn’t know that yet, which means that the biggest thing to happen to him recently was his first Christmas.

But what do you get a royal baby who has everything? Apparently, the same stuff you’d get any other infant. According to Us Weekly, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle bought their son books, building blocks, and a baby ball pit for Christmas.

It’s this last one that piqued our interest. Books and building blocks are classic (and sustainable) toys. The baby ball pit? Well, the first thing it brings to mind are interminable trips to Chuck E. Cheese and the kinds of germs no parent wants their kid to touch.

Last year, researchers tested ball pits in physical therapy clinics for microbes. They found 31 bacterial species and one yeast species, including those responsible for pink eye, UTIs, heart inflammation, and other infections.

Fatherly IQ
  1. When shopping for toys, what's the most important quality you look for?
    That it's fun.
    That it is educational.
    That it will keep my child's attention.
    That it won't drive me insane.
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To be fair, the authors of that study said that exposure to these germs is only really a concern for immuno-compromised kids, and that they can actually help healthy kids build up immunities.

“We’re talking about pediatric physical therapy patients that may have some immune problems and may be more fragile. If kids are healthy, let them go and play. It may help build their immune system,” Dobrusia Bialonska, assistant professor of environmental microbiology at the University of North Georgia, told HealthDay.

Hopefully that fact that it’s his own personal ball pit will also mean that Archie’s Christmas gift won’t be quite as crawling with germs as those in a public pit.