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Outrage Stirs in China After Discovery of Thousands of Faulty Vaccines for Kids

This follows a very similar but larger incident late last year.

flickr VCU CNS

People throughout China are outraged after the country’s Food and Drug Administration (CFDA), found that hundreds of thousands of vaccinations administered to Chinese children by Changchun Changsheng Biotechnology (CCB) have since been deemed defective. The finding has since prompted the CFDA to revoke CCB’s license for human rabies and tetanus vaccines and recall of all of the companies currently unused products.  

The issue first became apparent to the public after an official government inspection of the company’s facilities in mid-July. At that point, authorities determined that the company had not only made up production and testing records but falsified production specifications as well.

What may be worse is that many of the defective products have already been in the market and given to kids as part of China’s well-intention mandatory vaccination program. Despite the fact that the drugs are known to be defective, no one is sure what the exact side effects will be. For most parents who know that their children have gotten vaccinations from CCB, it’s all just a waiting game now.

At least 100,000 doses of the faulty tetanus drug have been handed out in just the Shandong Province of China alone but closer to 250,000 were put into circulation on top of that. Still, this whole situation is part of a larger problem when it comes to taking industry shortcuts in China, and it’s upending the public’s trust. This ordeal is coming right on the wings of a 2017 incident in which 400,000 doses of the same rabies and tetanus drugs made by the Wuhan Institute of Biological Products were found to be defective.

“Our trust has been overdrawn again and again, it’s so irresponsible for everyone’s life,” Tweeted one person who was affected by the recall.