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Even Michael Jackson’s Former Collaborators Are Coming Out Against Him

"I felt sorry for Michael."

Getty

Michael Jackson has recently come under fire with the debut of Leaving Neverland, a documentary that exposes the late pop star as a sexual predator. And now, Jackson’s music video producer, Rudi Dolezal, is speaking out about the rumors that he claims are likely true.

“I believe almost every word. It’s brilliant work,” Dolezal told Page Six of the film, in which two men, James Safechuck, 40, and Wade Robson, 36, describe how Jackson sexually abused them when they were kids.

While loyal fans have accused the men of lying (with some even planning to sue Safechuck and Robson for dirtying Jackson’s reputation), Dolezal disagrees.

The Austrian director and producer, who first worked with Jackson when he filmed the “Dangerous” tour in Munich in 1992, said it’s easy to understand why the two victims originally denied the abuse. “Nobody would stop Michael. It’s hard to believe an icon is a con,” he explained.

Dolezal did admit “I felt really sorry for Michael,” citing how Jackson’s dad taught the singer to dance by putting a then four-year-old Jackson on a hot stovetop, forcing him to move his feet.

However, that didn’t stop the music video producer from calling his former collaborator a “predator.” He went on to end the interview with Page Six by saying, “If the Michael Jackson legend is destroyed by this, the person responsible is Michael Jackson — no one else.”

And Dolezal isn’t the only one taking a stand against the King of Pop. Not only have radio stations around the world begun banning Jackson’s music but The Simpsons pulled an episode of their show that guest starred the late singer. Even a museum in Indianapolis removed all Michael Jackson artifacts from their exhibits while Louis Vuitton announced it will no longer sell items from its Jackson-inspired clothing line.