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Here’s Why This Gun Owner Willingly Handed Over His AK-47 to the Police

"We need to get 'em off the streets."

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A recent spate of high-profile mass shootings—and the overall insane amount of American gun violence—inspired one Texas man to do what many gun owners find unthinkable.

Billy, who did not provide his last name, told Fox 7 Austin that it was “hard to ignore” the news, particularly the shootings in El Paso, Dayton, and Midland-Odessa, all of which happened in the past month in Billy’s home state. His personal solution? Turn his AK-47 into the police.

A gun owner since the age of 10, Billy nevertheless decommissioned his weapon, the most popular assault rifle in the world, and brought it to a police station. A somewhat bemused officer suggested that selling it to a gun shop might be another option, one that Billy quickly rejected.

“We need to get ’em off the streets. I need to get mine all the streets, I can only speak for myself and pray for everyone else,” he said, seemingly reticent, in classic Texas fashion, to appear as though he was telling his neighbors what to do with their property.

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“I don’t want it out on the street. You don’t want it out there on the street either, sir,” he told the officer. “Y’all’s job is hard enough.”

Billy told the station that he was trying to “make a safer place for you and me and my grandbabies” and that waiting for Congress to act—something that hasn’t happened in the face of unspeakable violence thanks to weenies like John Cornyn—isn’t an option.

“I don’t need them to pass a law to let me know what’s right, necessarily. A case like this, it’s so plain: the time is now.”