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Watch Florida Kids Collectively Freak Out About the Snow

The powerful low-pressure system currently slamming the eastern seaboard means some kids in Florida are seeing snow for the first time.

Meteorologists have identified the massive cold front currently pummeling the east coast with snow as a “bomb cyclone.” This Mega Manlevel sounding phenomenon happens when the pressure inside the storm drops so fast that its’ power becomes ‘explosive’. While the storm is no joke for many (notably district superintendents who shut down schools down the eastern seaboard), it’s all good news for kids in Tallahassee, Florida, who are freaking out about the very rare, very exciting 0.1 inch snowfall.

While 0.1 inches isn’t very much at all, the last time there was any measurable snowfall in the whole of Northern Florida was in 1989. That means Tallahassee residents would need to be somewhere between 34 and 35 today to have seen snow in their native state as children

Parents took to social media — and specifically Instagram — to document their children’s bafflement and elation at this white stuff falling from the sky. The youngest kids seemed stunned, but many quickly adjusted, making snow angels and very small snowmen. One small girl was even seen looking up at the sky, trying to catch snowflakes on her tongue and proclaiming that it was the “best day ever”. Here are some of our favorites:

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bdfv76XHKFu/

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdgOOGSH1Bs/?taken-by=poshbykimw

More than anything, such a rare occurrence will create special memories for Florida kids that will always stand out in time. One Instagram user posted a photo of a father and child playing outside during a 1951 snowfall in Hastings, Florida. Almost 70 years later and it’s hard to imagine the sight of snow in America’s panhandle feeling less novel anytime soon.