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Felicity Huffman Will Reportedly Plead Guilty in College Admissions Scandal

A dozen other parents are expected to plead guilty as well.

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Since the news of the college admissions scandal broke last month, it has become one of the biggest stories of 2019. Now, the story may be coming to an unhappy conclusion for many of the 33 parents accused, as the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced today that more than a dozen defendants were set to plead guilty, including actress Felicity Huffman.

The Desperate Housewives star was charged with one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud, as she allegedly paid $15,000 to admissions consultant William Singer to get her daughter a better SAT score. Huffman was arrested on March 12 before being released on a $250,000 bail.

“I am pleading guilty to the charge brought against me by the United States Attorney’s Office,” Huffman said in a statement obtained by Fox News.

According to Singer, Huffman paid to have her daughter receive extra time on her SAT. He also may have hired a proctor to correct wrong answers on Huffman’s daughter’s test, as that is something Singer has admitted to doing and Huffman’s daughter reportedly received an SAT score 400 points higher than her PSAT score. Huffman’s husband, William H. Macy, was not charged in the case but court documents have indicated he was aware of the situation.

The news of Huffman and a dozen other parents pleading guilty comes less than a week after Peter Jan Sartorio, a packaged-food entrepreneur, became the first parent to plead guilty in the now infamous College admission scandal. Anyone found guilty on the fraud counts could face up to 20 years in prison. However, most experts argue that jail time is unlikely for first-time offenders. Still, some have argued that jail time is a real possibility for defendants who plead guilty.