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A Bomb Squad Created Beeping Easter Eggs for Blind Kids

They're helping kids have a blast.

getty

On Wednesday, a bomb squad based in Corpus Christi, Texas used a little DIY magic to give visually-impaired children a chance to participate in an upcoming Easter egg hunt. The trick? Making the eggs beep.

The DIY creations were crafted for the affectionally-named Beeping Eggstravaganza, an egg hunt specifically for visually-impaired children that will have its fifth edition in March. The free event is primarily for children with visual impairments, but their siblings won’t have to miss out on the fun, either: all children will be allowed to participate, as long as they wear a blindfold and use a cane to find the eggs. The goal is to give kids who aren’t disabled a glimpse into the life of their visually-impaired siblings. Of the 1.3 million people in the U.S. who are legally blind, about 100,000 of them are school-aged children.

It’s often assumed that blind people can’t see anything at all and simply navigate the world in complete darkness. But blindness – like most disabilities – exists on a spectrum. Though many will rely entirely on sound to find the eggs, some of the children can vaguely make out colors and shapes.

Alana Manrow, director of public affairs and development at Whataburger Field (where the event is taking place), noted in an interview with The Caller Times that some kids are even moved to tears by the opportunity to participate in the Easter egg hunt. “Most kids don’t have the opportunity to do this,” she said. 

The clever construction of the beeping eggs is actually pretty simple: The bomb squad places small pizza savers into the eggs, allowing them hold a 9-volt battery and the beeping devices in place with rubber bands. The holes on the top and bottom of the plastic eggs allow the sound to escape, and they create room for a switch to turn the eggs off.