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This Map Shows the Best and Worst States to Raise a Healthy Kid

Every state, ranked.

WalletHub

If you want your child to be healthy, you may want to consider moving to Vermont. It was recently found to be the best state for children’s healthcare, according to a WalletHub study that ranks each state from best to worst in terms of cost, access, and quality of medical treatment.

To compile the list, researchers analyzed healthcare for kids ages zero to 17 in three main categories: kids’ health and access to healthcare; kids’ nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; and kids’ oral health. These categories were evaluated on 33 key metrics from the average cost of a doctor’s visit to the percentage of vaccinated children.

Vermont tops the rankings, with a high percentage of children in “excellent or very good health” as well as the highest number of pediatricians and family doctors per capita in the whole country. It’s followed by Massachusetts, Rhode Island, District of Columbia, and Connecticut to round out the top five.

And not only are the top five states all East Coast states but so are nine out of the top 10. With New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, and Maryland all ranking high, the only state in the top 10 that isn’t on the East Coast is California.

On the other end of the spectrum, Mississippi was found to be the worst state for a child’s health, with the highest infant death rate and the highest rate of obesity among children. Also at the bottom are Oklahoma, Alaska, Indiana, and Texas. The Lonestar State, for instance, has the highest percentage of uninsured kids along with a high proportion of children with poor dental health.

But across all states, one thing is consistent: raising a child is expensive. WalletHub reports that it costs parents over $230,000, a large chunk of which is dedicated to healthcare alone.

Source: WalletHub

For the full list of state rankings, visit WalletHub’s website here.