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This 10-Year-Old’s Palindrome About Having Dyslexia Goes Viral

It's as clever as it is inspiring.

Jane Broadis/Twitter

When asked to write a palindrome, which can be read in both directions, one 10-year-old student wrote an incredibly moving poem titled “Dyslexia” about what’s it like to have a learning disorder.

Her teacher, Jane Broadis, loved it so much that she posted the piece on Twitter on Wednesday morning—and now it’s going viral. “Today in Y6 we looked at poems that could be read forwards & backwards,” she tweeted, with a photo of the poem. “I was stunned by this one written by one of my 10-year-olds.”

Read from top to bottom, the girl’s poem expresses how difficult and frustrating it can be to be dyslexic and how it can affect someone’s self-esteem. “I was meant to be great. That is wrong. I am a failure,” she says in the second stanza.

But read from bottom to top, it becomes a self-motivating speech about how she can do anything, despite her learning disorder. Take the second stanza again, for instance. Now it reads, “I am a failure. That is wrong. I was meant to be great.”

The powerful poem has already received over 110,000 likes and 33,000 retweets as users applaud the girl for her bravery and honesty.

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Some shared their own experiences with dyslexia along with words of encouragement for the young student. “Dyslexia doesn’t stop you doing anything. You just have to find a way around the obstacle. Sidestep it,” one person tweeted while another said, “This is the most insightful and beautiful poem I’ve ever read on the subject. -proud mom to a dyslexic honor student who proved them all wrong.”