Being The Breadwinner Is Bad For Men
Don't Be A Hero

Why Being The Breadwinner Is Bad For You, According To A New Study

When researchers from Harvard University looked at 46 years worth of data from 6,300 married couples from 1968 to 2013, they found that there was one reason women divorce their husbands: Failing to bring home the bacon. However, another vast study that will be presented at the American Sociological Association’s upcoming annual conference suggests being the breadwinner might be bad for you — and not because of the carbs. That’s unfortunate, because this sounded like the start of a relationship BLT. 

Being The Breadwinner Is Bad For Men

The ASA’s research looked at 15 years of data obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on married people between ages 18 and 32. The results showed that men were worse off when they were their family’s sole breadwinner — specifically, 5 percent less happy and 3.5 percent less healthy than couples whose partners contributed equally. “The data definitely seems to indicate that, in general, as men take responsibility for greater and greater shares of the couple’s pooled income, they experience declines in their psychological well-being and health,” concluded sociology professor, and lead author of the study, Christin Munsch. This may explain why you’re kind of toast.

But before you put your 2 weeks notice in, it’s important to note that most of these findings were specific to millennial men, and you already knew they were soft. The other good news is that researchers found women’s psychological well-being improved when they earned more, and their health was unaffected overall. This echoes the mounting amount of evidence that shows equitable relationships are more successful than old fashioned ones. The missus working more could mean more work around the house for you, but it also means a second paycheck and maybe more sex. That’s the best thing since sliced bread.

[H/T] Time

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