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Her Parents Are Going To Need Vacuum Arms

This 10-Year-Old Girl Designed Her Own Prosthetic Arm And It’s A Glitter Cannon

If screaming at registers not previously conceived by humans is a superpower (and it is), your own kids are totally superheroes, but they’ve got nothing on 10-year-old Jordan Reeves. As part of the Superhero Cyborgs program, Reeves just designed herself a prosthetic arm that doubles as a glitter cannon — so she’s basically the genius little girl any parent dreams of, using her powers to build a tool every parent dreads.

The 5-day workshop, hosted by the “kid-integrated design firm” KIDMob and 3D printing software firm Autodesk, connected kids with upper-limb differences (from accidents or birth) with designers who could help them create prosthetics that the kids actually wanted to use. In Reeves’ case, this was “Project Unicorn”: a 5-barrel cannon that shoots glitter with the pull of a string. That’s as opposed to, say, the girl who built an elbow-activated squirt gun. All the kids at the workshop are paired with a mentor for the next 6 months to help them refine the prosthetic, so Reeves’ parents can look forward to maximum glitter coverage of her bedroom, the living room, and — if they’re lucky — their bedroom, too.

[youtube https://youtu.be/SOhpPZsXMnQ expand=1]

To her credit, Reeves’ mother isn’t worried. “Who cares?” She told Fast Company. “It’s fun and exciting and it’s a really cool way to empower kids.” And, to Superhero Cyborg’s credit, Reeves’ mentor will help her create another prosthetic designed to help with more prosaic task, like picking stuff up. Because only so many of life’s problems can be solved by blasting them with glitter.

[H/T] Fast Company

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