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Hard To Swallow

Why You Being Hungry Might Lead To Your Kids Being Stuffed

According to a study from the University of Florida, parenting is a lot like grocery shopping; you don’t want to do it when you’re hungry (like you have a choice). The findings, published in the June issue Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, suggests that your hunger could influence how much you feed your kid during mealtimes.

Mother-child pairs completed 10 minute play sessions, after which, researchers had parents rate their hunger and their kid’s hunger on a scale of one to 7. Then the pairs were given food and drinks while coders observed through a one-way mirror. Overall, mothers who rated their own hunger higher were more likely to feed their kids more. Still, the data is considered preliminary due to the limited small sample size (only 29 children ages 3 to 6) and more research needs to be done — ideally on dads next time, who prefer to pronounce it as hangry. But judging from your personal research, you’re way less likely share your mac ‘n cheese than most moms.

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Though hungry parents fed their kids more, researchers found that a majority of parents overfed their children regardless of their own appetites. On average parents served their kids 573 calories, while the study’s authors recommend about 400 calories for that age group. The children seemed to split the difference, consuming 445 of those calories. Experts suspect that part of the reason for this is because of how much food was provided for free to the parents: Baby carrots, apple slices, cheese slices, crackers, cookies, macaroni and cheese, vegetable lasagna, chicken nuggets, water, 1 percent milk, and apple juice. Don’t act like you wouldn’t run out of that study with pockets full of chicken nuggets, too.

[H/T] Science News Daily

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