All The Food And Exercise Advice You Need In 2016

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DadBod somehow became a thing in 2015, but to paraphrase your favorite dean, pale, flabby, and groaning from a bad back is no way to go through life. You’ve got more than enough excuses to sit around on your ass looking festively plump this time of year — fatherhood isn’t one. Need proof? Look no further than these 10 marathoners, weightlifters, crossfitters, yogis, and trainers who dare to defy DadBod on a daily basis. Their advice and inspiration should remind you that you don’t have to wait until January 1 to get yourself or your family moving, eating, and feeling right when any damn day will do. Your wife should remind you that DadBod was supposed to be a joke, not a lifestyle choice.

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Literally Do Anything
“When you start training, don’t compare yourself to your world record 20s. Just try to train every day for 30 minutes. You have to make that commitment and maybe it’s going to suck, but it doesn’t even have to be high quality: Did I go downstairs and work up a sweat or not? It’s a 1 or a 0, did I do something today? Be consistent before you’re heroic.”
Kelly Starrett, Crossfit Pioneer, Olympic Trainer, New York Times Bestselling Author

“If you have one Sunday in 3 weeks free, are you gonna booze away the Saturday night before or plan around an epic long run that’ll be key to your preparation?”

They’re Not Missed Drinks, They’re Opportunities
“Figure out how bad you want it, and then apply that calculus to the specifics of your training. If you have one Sunday in 3 weeks free, are you gonna booze away the Saturday night before or plan around an epic long run that’ll be key to your preparation? These choices parenthood creates for you are the building blocks of success for athletes with children.”
Knox Robinson, Nike+ Run Club Coach, 2:36 Marathoner

Ease Into It
“Ideally you’d like to stretch 2 or 3 times during the day for short bursts, but especially right when you get up in the morning. The trick is to take it nice and easy. A lot of times, men and women, especially men, try to turn a stretch into a strengthening exercise. At the end of the day, being able to be an engaged father means you’re able to move comfortably without pain.”
Chris Frankel, Head Of Training And Education For TRX

There’s Never Too Many Cooks
“[After cooking meals together], it goes from something you’re foisting on them to something they’ve participated in; they want to share something amazing with dad or mom. That’s been a game changer.”
Jared Stone, Author Of Year Of The Cow

Child’s Pose — Not Just For Adults Anymore!
“Kundalini Yoga, Hatha Yoga, Yin Yoga — anything the parent is visibly enjoying and benefitting from will benefit the child.”
Elena Brower, Yoga Instructor, Author Of The Art Of Attention Yoga Guidebook Series

Facebook / Dean Karnazes

Show Up And Shut Up
“I think [my kids] appreciate the fact that I’m not a sideline ‘soccer dad’ barking orders at the coach and screaming at the referees. Whenever there’s a game or event that’s important to my kids, I make it a point to be there. It’s good for both of us.”
Dean Karnazes, Ultramarathoner, New York Times Bestselling Author

More Cook, Less Book
“Most people today crack a recipe book and then go out and get the ingredients you need to make that recipe. In local eating, that pattern is reversed — you get what’s available, and then come home and figure out what you can make with that. This reversed process puts an emphasis on knowing how to cook things, rather than make recipes. So if you can patch together a fairly small patchwork of cooking skills, you can make something tasty with whatever’s in season.”
James MacKinnon, Co-Author Of The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating

There Is A Season, Turn, Turn, Turn (And Squat, Bend, Reach)
“There are seasons in life. Be ok saying, ‘I don’t have time for an hour workout, so I’ll just do 10 or 20 minutes [of mobility movements]. It’s what you do in life. You’re lunging, you’re squatting, you’re bending, reaching and twisting.”
Randy Hetrick, Founder Of TRX, Navy SEAL

Help Them Help You
“Having your shoulders pulled forward gets old quickly … [Wrapping your child to your back] is as close to your spine as you can get … There’s a logic to the traditional methods of carrying kids. Helping their posture helps reduce the load on your system.”
Esther Gokhale, Posture Guru, Founder Of The Gokhale Method

It Is About How You Start
“The best thing you can do early on is promote free play. Find a field, find objects, and let them throw and catch and run and play games and have fun. That needs to take place early on to make sure we’re giving our kids an active start.”
Mike Curtis, Head Strength And Conditioning Coach For University Of Virginia Men’s Basketball

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