This Is Why You Want Your Kid To Be Born In The Summer

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Turns out your kid’s birth month might determine more than just how good of a hockey player they can be. Recent research found a correlation between when a baby is born and how healthy that child will become. And unlike those vaguely accurate descriptions of your personality, this prediction has nothing to do with stars.

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After reviewing data from 450,000 people in the UK Biobank, researchers from the University of Cambridge found that babies born in summer months, specifically June, July, and August, are less likely to have low birth weights, be short and, for girls, show signs of early puberty. “Those are all markers of growth and development that have been associated with higher risks of adult diseases,” Dr. Ken Ong, a pediatric endocrinologist and co-author of the study, told the Huffington Post. “I hope people will find it fascinating that events in early life can have very long-lasting benefits.”Study ChartHuffPo was quick to point out that this study has squat to do with astrology. Unlike your local gypsy, the researchers aren’t making any claims of causation until they know exactly why summer babies become maven world-beaters. Still, experts have a realistic hypothesis as to what causes this phenomenon: fetal programming, the idea that the environment a fetus is exposed to in the womb determines the baby’s development later in life. Behind this rationale are the possible benefits of early exposure to summer sunlight providing higher levels of vitamin D for the fetus and newborn. But don’t slap bronzer your preggo wife just yet; all theories linking to early exposure of potato salad, baseball, and terrible action films are equally unproven.

Whatever the reasons behind the results, if this data works its way into mainstream parenting circles, prepare yourself for a glut of kids being born in June, July and August. And October, November, and December just became a guy’s favorite months of the year … Hey-o!

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